Cryptoregister.io

Simple descriptions of cryptocurrency terms and projects.

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Airswap

Website Source Code

A decentralized exchange for ERC20 tokens built on Ethereum which aims to solve some of the issues with other decentralized exchanges with their SWAP protocol.

Ardor

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

A blockchain & coin with a focus on business applications, that is the successor to NXT. It has a number of "child-chains" and coins in an attempt to solve scalability issues, the first of which is called "Ignis".

Bancor

Website Source Code

An Ethereum based project to improve interchange between ERC20-ish coins (smart tokens), via an intermediary token (BNT).

Bcoin

Website Source Code

A full node Bitcoin implementation written in Javascript.

Blockstack

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

A network for developing decentralized apps, blockchain agnostic, considered “tier 2” infrastructure.

Binance

Website

A major coin exchange based in South Korea.

Bitcoin (Core) (BTC/XBT)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Original, flagship, crypto currency.

Bitcoin Cash (BCH)

Website Wikipedia Entry

Forked from Bitcoin August 1st 2017, for complex reasons including political and opinions on scaling (Block size/lightning Network).

Bitcoin Gold (BTG)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Fork of Bitcoin and split of the Bitcoin blockchain in an attempt to further decentralize the blockchain by reducing the effectiveness of specialized hardware (ASICs).

Bitcoin-NG

Todo

Bitfinex

Website Wikipedia Entry

A major exchange, once hacked, possibly with some curious links to Tether. Based in Taiwan.

Bitpay

Website Wikipedia Entry

A Payment processor which allows merchants to accept Bitcoin and receive local currency. They also sponsor some of Bitcoin core’s development and have worked to spread Bitcoin's adoption generally. High transaction fees on the bitcoin network have not helped their business.

Bithumb

Website

A major exchange, based in South Korea.

Bitshares

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

A delegated proof-of-stake blockchain & coin with integrated exchange, which also allows for user-issued coins to be created and managed with smart contracts. Based upon Graphene.

Bittrex

Website

A major exchange, based in the US.

Blackcoin (BLK)

Website Source Code

First proof of stake blockchain, forked from Bitcoin.

Casper

Source Code

The Ethereum proof-of-stake implementation

Cardano (ADA)

Website Source Code

Proof of stake, smart contract blockchain + ADA coin, built in Haskell by IOHK.

Coinhive

Website Source Code

A Javascript library that allows for mining of Monero in web pages.

Coinkite

Website

Open source wallet software, now deprecated as the company focusses on enterprise offerings.

Colored Coins

Wikipedia

A term for alt coins (often fungible in nature) that are designed to be linked to real world assets - i.e. ownership of a specific coin entitles you to ownership of a real-world thing, such as a car, property or share certificate.

Copay

Website source code

Bitcoin wallet software developed by BitPay.

CryptoNote

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

A protocol and set of tools that power a number of privacy focussed coins including Monero. It includes CryptoNight, an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) resistant hash function.

The DAO

Wikipedia Entry

"decentralized, Autonomous Organisation" - a smart contract built on Ethereum designed to act like a Venture Capitalist (handing out money to projects) that was hacked, causing the Ethereum Classic fork (i.e. undoing the hack).

Dash (XCO)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Blockchain & coin run on a two tier node system (master / mining) with additional functionality such as instant & private payments. Originally forked from Bitcoin.

Dogecoin

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Created as a parody of Bitcoin, with which it shares the same early code base with a few tweaked parameters (e.g. a 1 minute block time, utilization of Scrypt rather than SHA-256). Much scandal.

Corda

Website Source Code

Distributed ledger (not blockchain) platform designed to be a private network between financial institutions, built by R3.

Electrum

Website Source Code

Popular, open source wallet software written in Python.

EOS

Website Source Code

Fork of Bitshares/Graphene looking to be an Ethereum competitor, built in Web Assembly by Block.one.

ERC-20

Source Code

An interface specification for standardizing Ethereum tokens. By implementing the given methods and properties, it allows the tokens to work with other things such as exchanges and wallets predictably.

ERC-721

An interface specification for standardizing non-fungible Ethereum tokens. Allows for predicable behavior and interaction. First popular implementation was by Cryptokitties.

EtherDelta

Website Source Code

An early Ethereum based decentralized exchange that allows the trade of ERC20 tokens.

Ethereum (ETH)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Blockchain and coin with Turing complete scripting abilities via the Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM).

Ethereum Classic

Website Wikipedia Entry

Hard fork of Ethereum blockchain pre-DAO attack.

Falcon Network

Website

A network of Bitcoin nodes optimised for the fast communication of block information for miners. It allows for improved efficiency across the system (fewer orphans, reduced wasted hash power).

FIBRE Network

Website Source Code

A network designed for fast block transfer - see Falcon Network above.

FileCoin (FIL)

Website Wikipedia Entry

Blockchain based decentralized file storage using IPFS (which they created). The coin (FIL) is earned by serving files.

GDAX

Website

Major exchange which powers Coinbase, based in the US

Gemini

Website Wikipedia Entry

Exchange run by the Winklevoss twins (of Facebook fame) based in the US.

Geth

Website Source Code

An Ethereum client implementation written in Go-lang.

Golem

Website Source Code

An Ethereum ERC20 coin used to pay for computation on machines.

Gridcoin (G)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Proof of stake based blockchain + coin which distributes additional coins for proof of research / computation.

Hyperledger

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Corporate sponsored set of blockchain / cryptocurrency related tools with a goal of advancing cross-industry collaboration.

IOTA

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Coin + Tangle (comparable to a blockchain) designed for the internet of things. Uses proof of work. To send a transaction, a node needs to verify two existing ones.

Kraken

Website Wikipedia Entry

Major exchange based in the US, selected as the "trustee" for MtGox which allows claimants to claim lost funds from them.

Lightning Network

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Layer 2 solution for Bitcoin payments using off-chain channels between users designed to solve scalability issues. The Ethereum implementation of this is called Raiden.

Lisk (LSK)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Blockchain + coin focussed on developer tools and application development, where each application (built using node.js) runs it's own side chain. Runs on delegated proof-of-stake.

Litecoin (LTC)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Earl you alt-coin to Bitcoin (from which it was forked), uses Scrypt instead of SHA3 and has a 2.5 min (rather than Bitcoin's 10 min) block time.

Maidsafe (SAFE)

Website Source Code

Blockchain + coin enabling a decentralized file store and code execution, allowing for a decentralized web.

MasterCoin

Now rebranded Omni Layer, it was originally a fork of Bitcoin designed to offer additional functionality.

Mist Browser

Source Code

A web browser based on Chromium which includes an Ethereum client (Geth) and allows users to interact with Ethereum based DApps.

Moolah

Dogecoin exchange, now bankrupt.

Monero (XMR)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Privacy focussed blockchain + coin based on CryptoNote (it was one of the first CryptoNote based cryptocurrencies), runs on proof-of-work. Formerly BitMonero. Because of it's privacy it has attracted a lot of illicit use.

Mt Gox

Wikipedia Entry

The original, now defunct, Bitcoin exchange, hacked multiple times. Was based in Japan.

Namecoin (NMC)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Blockchain and coin (originally set up to use the Bitcoin blockchain) that is used to manage ownership of .bit domain names and could in principle be used to manage other naming/ownership systems.

Nem (XEM)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Blockchain and coin that runs on proof-of-importance and unusually is a mixture of open and closed source software. It powers the private Mijin network which aims to improve banking processes in Japan.

NEO (NEO & GAS)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Formerly Antshares, NEO is a blockchain supporting smart contracts and is often compared to Ethereum. Strong ties to Chinese organisations and possibly government.

NXT

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Proof-of-stake blockchain, designed to be a platform upon which applications & financial services could be built. Includes an integrated exchange, upon which user-created tokens can be traded.

Omise GO (OMG)

A project built partially on Ethereum (as well as it's own blockchain) that plans to use Plasma for scalability. The focus is on bringing a variety of financial services to Asian markets. The OMG token is an ERC-20 token.

Omni Layer

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Protocol built on-top of the Bitcoin blockchain to enable user-created coins and other more advanced functionality. Compares itself to the "HTTP" of Bitcoin's "TCP/IP". Formerly MasterCoin, source code forked from Bitcoin.

Parity

Website Source Code

A lightweight Ethereum client implementation written in Rust, available via your browser once installed.

PeerCoin (PPC)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Fork of the Bitcoin code base, implements a hybrid proof-of-stake/proof-of-work blockchain, allows for 1% inflation.

Plasma

Website

A proposed improvement to Ethereum that helps to improve scalability via the use of side-chains which are periodically validated against the main blockchain.

Polkadot

Website Source Code

A project created by an Ethereum Founder (Gavin Wood) to link different blockchains together, allowing them to communicate and validating their state. Currently some code forms part of the Parity code base.

Poloniex

Website

US based exchange.

Primecoin

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

An early fork of Bitcoin with an adapted proof-of-work function that involves searching for new prime numbers (i.e. doing something actually useful). Also has a reduced (1 minute rather than 10) block time.

QTUM

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Hybrid Bitcoin and Ethereum based blockchain (thus supporting EVM based smart contracts) which runs on proof-of-stake and is based in China and Singapore.

Raiden

Website Source Code

A lightning-network implementation for Ethereum. It helps to improve scalability by collating many smaller transactions, the net results of which can be periodically written to the main chain.

Reddcoin

Website Source Code

Focussed on tipping for social networks (first and foremost Reddit). Code forked from Litecoin, thus runs on proof-of-stake.

Ripple (XRP)

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Payments & settlement network uses a select handful of validators verify transactions via consensus rather than a blockchain. Multiple tokens can represent things such as fiat or a commodity. Aimed at bank to bank transactions.

SegWit (Segregated Witness)

Wikipedia Entry

An improvement to the Bitcoin protocol (and has been implemented in other protocols such as Litecoin) which involves separating the signature (Witness) data from the transactions allowing for improved security and reduced blocksize.

SimpleToken (OST)

Website

Tokens as a service: built on top of Ethereum to allows others to easily create their own tokens (called "Branded Tokens"), plus tools to manage them. Has it's own Token (OST) as an intermediary.

Solidity

Website Source Code Wikipedia Entry

A programming language that can be used to write smart contracts that run on the Ethereum blockchain.

Stellar

Website Source Code Wikipedia Entry

A blockchain originally forked from Ripple (by one of Ripple's founders, Jed McCaleb), with fast (2-5 second) transaction times, settled via the Stellar Consensus Protocol. It has a distributed exchange baked in and has tokens representing different assets, such Dollars, Euros and it's own currency called Lumens.

Storj

Todo

Tendermint

Todo

Tether

Website Wikipedia Entry

A token issued with the Omni Layer protocol (thus using the Bitcoin blockchain) that is pegged to the dollar (i.e. 1 tether is always worth 1 dollar), designed to make exchange between currencies easier. Linked to Bitfinex in the Panama papers leak.

Tezos

Website Source Code

A blockchain and smart contract platform (which runs the Michelson programming language) often compared to Ethereum. It has a structured protocol improvement process, is due for release in February 2018 and raised a $238m at ICO, a record at the time.

Ubiq (UBQ)

Website Source Code Wikipedia Entry

A fork of Ethereum adjusted to have a deflationary monetary system (similar to Bitcoin), based in China.

Verge (XVG)

Website Source Code

A fork of Bitcoin adapted to run on the TOR network to increase the level of anonymity (thus ensuring IP addresses of incoming transactions can't be traced).

Waves Network

Website Source Code Wikipedia Entry

A blockchain platform running proof of stake, using Waves-NG (derived directly from Bitcoin-NG) with an integrated decentralized exchange. Any user can easily create their own tokens through the wallet software and basic smart contracts are under development.

Zcash

Website Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Implementation of the Zerocash protocol.

Zcoin

Website

Implementation of the Zerocoin protocol.

Zerocoin

Wikipedia Entry Source Code

Todo

Zerocash

Website

Todo

0xProject

Website Source Code

A decentralised exchange for ERC20 tokens, built on the Ethereum blockchain.

About

Cryptoregister was created out of a desire to understand how the various cryptocurrency projects that exist fit together and a frustration with the hype or fear/uncertainy/doubt that’s so often spread about any given project which makes it hard to interpret what these things actually are.

Inspired in part by AWS in plain english, and it aspires to be written like it might be said.

See Also